New Digital Inequalities blog series

connected globe

Researchers from the Oxford Internet Institute (OII) are coming together for a new blog series about digital inequalities. Through their masters, doctoral and postdoctoral work, contributors examine the differences digital technologies are making beyond Euro-American contexts and at global economic peripheries. This blog series will put a spotlight on their current research, showcasing cutting edge work on the uneven benefits instantiated by digitalisation.

Initial contributors include OII researchers Margie Cheesman [‘Decentralised identity: What is it, and what does it mean for marginalised populations?’, Nayana Prakash [‘Tech platforms and UK responses to India’s COVID crisis’], Daniel Arubayi[‘Be your own boss: Examining algorithmic burdens on ride-hailing drivers in the Global South’], and Mia Hassoun [‘The limits of “active” participation in smart city design’].

If you are an OII researcher and would like to participate in the series, please contact Margie or Nayana. Blogs can be between 200-1000 words. Future topics could include a discussion of your DPhil project, highlighting recently published work; analysis of a recent event or news story through a research lens. Please do get in touch with your ideas!

Margie Cheesman

Margie Cheesman is a digital anthropologist based at the Oxford Internet Institute. Margie works with communities using and making digitalisation projects. Her DPhil research examines the intervention of decentralised digital infrastructures (blockchains) in humanitarianism, and involves fieldwork in Jordan’s refugee camps. She is interested in how the development of money and identity infrastructures intersects with socio-economic inequalities and rights. Margie has worked for the civil liberties initiative, Open Migration, and the ESRC Centre for Research on Socio-cultural Change (CReSC). She has conducted research with international organisations such as InfoMigrants, GSMA Mobile for Development, and United Nations agencies. Margie is Assistant Editor of the journal Big Data & Society, and her editorial work includes Data Politics: Worlds, Subjects and Rights (Routledge, 2019) and Data Practices (forthcoming).